Past Appeals, Requests & Petitions

NABA is happy to publish your appeals and Requests on academic, cultural and humanitarian issues

Appeals
Requests & Studies
Petitions
APPEALS  

British Arab's attitudes towards mental health: A quesionnare. Requested by Aseel Hameed, January 2012 
www.surveymonkey.com/s/uclsurvey8
 A call to participate in a children's television gameshow based on the cartoon network series. Summer 2011 Mark Usher
For 2007 Appeals click here
2006
APPEALS
Appeal to save Iraqi Academics from Ministry of Higher Education in Iraq, March 2007
HRF Lebanon Appeal  - 25 July 2006 (Supported by NABA and BAMA)  
Sunday Walks for the aid of Palestine and Lebanon
Emergency Appeal for Lebanon by Mag Clear Mines, September 2006
Lebanese Popular Aid Committee Appeal, 23 July 2006
Emergency Action: Lebanon - Call for a general strike
Appeal from Dr Ashref AL-Hajouj Family  اشرف الحجوج July 2006  
Islamic Relief 26 July 2006
MPAUK Lebanon Appeal
Appeal from the Iraqi Cultural Association  Feb 2006
Reply to NABA request for free treatment for Iraqi children
Surplus Hospital Equipments to Countries in Need
October 2006
Dr Ashref Al-Hajjooj Appeal
Peace in Iraq Petition
August 2006
The impact of the War on Terror on the identity of British Arab - A study by Leila El-Wafi, UK (Essentially looking at the age group of 20-30): click the link for details and contact information.  
July 2006
Request for interviewing Arabs in London's Edgware Road for a university project by Farheen Megjhi July 2006 (This research has now come to an end, details have been removed as requested by the researcher).
2005
Volunteer drivers needed for project to Palestine on 13 July 2005
The League for  the Arabs of Jaffa Appeal -  The Arab Democratic School of Jaffa May 2005
Friends of Southern Sudan (BAFOSS) Meeting  July 2005
Iraqi Hospitals Supplies Appeal December 2005
University of Exeter: Bio Ethical Research:
Information:  Word Document / pdf file
Questionnaires:   Word document / pdf file
Arab Leukaemia Appeal Autumn 2004
Arabic, Egyptian films for "Good News 4 Film Music"  Nour El-Tonny
Appeal for a Kurdish Child in need of bone marrow transplant
University of Edinburgh's Iraqi Universities Books Appeal - Whom to Contact? Summer 2003
Prof. Sulaiman Interview (1) Summer 2003
Prof. Sulaiman Interview (2) Summer 2003


Great Ormond Street Hospital

To: naba.org.uk
Sent: Friday, November 18, 2005 9:00 AM
Subject: Re: Request for help

Thank you for your email. NHS hospitals are not permitted to treat patients for free (or at discounted rates) if they are not eligible for NHS treatment. Our charitable funds cannot be used for individual treatment so our hands are tied. 

Fully private hospitals can treat patients for free if they choose.

We do work with the charity Chain of Hope which funds some cases here, and they have an office in London. I do strongly recommend that you speak to them. If funding was available, in principle I am sure we could help. we would need full medical details in English and some guarantee the full costs of treatment would be paid.


Stephen Cox
Chief Press Officer
Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust and the Institute of Child Health
3rd Floor, Ormond House
26-27 Boswell St
London WC1N 3JZ

Dear 

Chain of Hope would only be able to assist with the children suffering from heart defects, and unfortunatley cannot assist with the children suffering from other conditions.
Thank you for the details about the Human Relief Foundation and further information about the work you do.
Your support is much appreciated.
I am sending a DHL to Baghdad to try and locate Dr.Iman Al Obedy and Dr. Nasser El Zohairy for their potential support of the
work of the Chain of Hope.

I have just written you a letter and am putting details of the children with eye defecets in the post to you, 

Many thanks for your co-operation,

Lisa Yacoub, Programme Co-ordinator, Chain of Hope, South Parade, Chelsea, London SW3 6NP
Tel 0044 207 351 1978 / Fax 0044 207 352 1198 / www.chainofhope.org

Dear M Jalili

Thank you for your recent email regarding treatment. Unfortunately we cannot help on this occasion.

Kind Regards

Sean Collins
Corporate Administrator
Trust Offices, Royal London Hospital
Barts & The London NHS Trust
Tel: 020 7377 7000 ext: 2629

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Volunteer drivers needed for project to Palestine

Two volunteer drivers are needed for an exciting venture to Palestine and back..

On July 13th , 2005 a business man from Chester will be driving to Palestine with the /Caravan for Palestine/convoy to collect >Palestinian olive oil for sale in the UK.  The van will try to drive back via the Allenby Bridge to Jordan, through Syria, Turkey and into the EU.

The intention is to develop an overland trade route for fairly traded Palestinian olive oil, removing the need to use unreliable shipping companies. The 3 to 4 week trip will also be an act of friendship between the people of Palestine and Europe. Most of the costs of the trip will be covered, but volunteers will be expected to pay for their own living expenses such as food and accommodation, and obtain an international drivers licence.  A sense of humour is more essential than previous experience.
If you'd like further details of this exciting venture, please contact mary@olivecoop.com or 0161 273 1970.  For general guidance on visiting Palestine, see www.olivecoop.com or new guidebook 'Palestine and Palestinians'.

ISM London 
Web: http://www.ism-london.org   Forum:  http://www.ism-london.org/forum 

The League for the Arabs of Jaffa

The League for  the Arabs of Jaffa was established in 1979 to provide the entire community of some 20,000 Arabs with a voice in public affairs. As an apolitical association representing all, Christians and Muslims, the League has constantly placed community issues on the public agenda and has presented alternative policy guidelines both to official bodies and to the media. It has accepted the challenge of fighting to secure the continued existence of this ancient Arab community in freedom, equality and human dignity and making its own contribution toculture, resolution of housing distress and education.

In the year of 2004 the League established  "The Arab Democratic School". The school had been a longstanding project to complement the League's 25 year old kindergarten , but pressing educational needs of some 158 students  triggered its foundation.

I hereby attach a preliminary materials about the league and the school.

We would be more than happy to provide you more details about its activities and its urgent financial and other needs.
We will be more than happy to provide you any additional details about the school.

Thanks in advance,
Yours sincerely,
Adeeb Machool

Fundraiser & Media Consultant
00 972-50-8-658749 
00 97236812290
email :adeebmachool@yahoo.com

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The League for the Arabs of Jaffa
The Arab Democratic School of Jaffa

The Arab Democratic School was founded by the League in Summer 2004. The school had been a longstanding project, to complement the Leagues 25 year old kindergarten, but pressing educational needs of  some 150 students had triggered the foundation in 2004.

The League for the Arabs of Jaffa was established, as an Ottoman Charitable Society in May 1979. A representative body of the Jaffa Arab community, the League is a voluntary organization, which aims to preserve the solidarity and cultural identity of the local Palestinian Arab community. It also strives to voice local concerns about planning and other governmental and municipal policies that target the area. The League’s Board of Governors is an elected body, whose members serve a two-year period.

The League maintains several projects to the benefit of the local community.

1) the Arab Cultural Centre contains a library and a computer literacy project. Major cultural and folkloric activities are offered ?activities rarely available to the community.

2) the Childhood Centre operates a kindergarten with an unique curriculum for children aged 3-5. The aim is to offer a program that prioritizes Palestinian culture and heritage while providing assistance to working mothers.

3) a Housing Rehabilitation Project has been running since the mid 1980s. Community members in areas most targeted by planning and zoning policies are offered the possibility to improve their housing quality and remain in the area.

The Educational System which serves the Arab community in Jaffa is among the weakest in Israel . The drop-out rate per age cohort averages between

40-50%. Inappropriate curricula, high teacher turnover and lack of support services all accentuate the effects of rampant poverty and institutional discrimination. Divided as it is between public Hebrew and Arab schools and private church schools, the system is largely uncoordinated. Consequently, it is difficult, if not impossible, to properly address the challenges that face the community as a whole. Parent participation is at best marginal, with the effect of further alienating students and educators. The end result is a weak performance of the entire system and a dismal percentage of those satisfying the Israeli Certificate of Matriculation (bogrut).

The Arab Democratic School emerged from this background with the aim of, not only offering the community an answer to pressing social challenges, but also a home to enhanced parental cooperation and participation. Within the broader context, the school does indeed offer an unique platform upon which parents have a say, participate as equals in decision making and contribute to the definition of the school’s vision and internal governance. The League strongly believes that the offering of such opportunities to parents and educators places the community on solid ground from which to implement effective educational strategies.

All decisions are made by parents and teachers, with the full participation of the school’s coordinator-principal.

The School is currently housed in a rented building in Gaza Street , Jaffa . The League incurred considerable expense to adapt this vast and spacious structure to the purposes of the project.  Following expert recommendations, the infrastructure was improved and classrooms designed for the needs of about 150 students in the elementary grades. Their teachers are all trained  and experienced educators.

The economic burden of operating the School has been assumed by the League, and this in addition to monthly tuition fees from parents and contributions from members of the community. However, the School is still in need of critical capital funding for development of the full range of curricular and educational activities suited to the local Palestinian community. We hope, eventually, to extend up to the secondary level that will offer the Israeli Matriculation Certificate (bogrut).

The School’s vision is to provide an educational setting that will contribute to the growth and maturity of the learners, and this based on the following principles:

"Encouragement of development of the individual "every student is entitled to respect of his/her human rights and dignity "dialogue between diverse individuals is critical for moral and social development? an important aspect of citizenship in a diverse society and community respect for, and preservation of the environment is key to social and communal life.

Within the School, adults and students share in managing a democratic and inclusive culture, within which the rules of conduct are determined with active participation of  the community. The School is currently establishing a joint student-teacher committee to deal with disciplinary issues in a shared fashion, in the belief that all should work together to resolve conflict and enable positive communication.

Within the School’s inclusive philosophy, each student meets with his/her personal educator once a week, as part of the curriculum. The educator’s role is to provide teachers and students with opportunity to clarify pathways for cognitive and e motional development. In this affectionate and collaborative frame, the School is truly child-centered.

Drama plays a central role, in collaboration with other Arab and  Jewish schools. The project also aims to address current issues, in order to provide students with comprehension and tools for participation in other cultures in an atmosphere of respect and equality.

The Arab Democratic School faces considerable challenges in finding the funding that will allow continued activity over time. The School seeks to rely less on tuition fees collected from economically disadvantaged families who wish to enroll their children. Their presence is critical if we are to sustain social diversity while catering equally for all, regardless of socio-economic background. Funds are also needed to secure running costs of the project, including the payment of  salaries and legally mandated benefits, maintenance and physical upgrading costs. Currently, the League tries to overcome the monthly deficit of  $15000 by recruiting nongovernmental and governmental organizations to help the school financially and looking forward for better future to the students.

The location of the School in rented premises also adds considerable strain on resources, as does the ongoing need for teaching training and professional development.  These funds are critically needed while we complete the process, now in hand, of registration of the School with the Ministry of Education.

The running of the Arab Democratic School as a community based project is in keeping with current educational policies of the Ministry and the Municipality of Tel Aviv-Jaffa .   The policies aim at enhancing school choice for communities, and the participation of parents in their children’s education. In this, we strongly believe that the Arab Democratic School fulfils a vital role? one which must continue and expand to include all the grades of a complete education and preparation for life.

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Iraqi Universities Libraries Appeal. 
Help us fill the shelves of Iraq's burnt-out  libraries. And whom to contact?  

Sunday Herald - 18 May 2003

 Help us fill the shelves of Iraq's burnt-out libraries

 The Sunday Herald is appealing to readers to donate vital

 English-language books

 By Alan Taylor

 

TODAY the Sunday Herald, in partnership with the University of Edinburgh, is launching a unique campaign to restock Iraq's looted libraries.  Amidst the shock over the plundering of priceless artworks from Iraq's National Museum of Antiquities, relatively little attention has been paid to the destruction of the nation's principallibraries. Now, however, to the despair of scholars around the world, the full extent of the damage is becoming clear. Many major research libraries in Iraq have been looted and burnt with the loss of hundreds of thousands of books and manuscripts, many of which may be irreplaceable. The National Library of Iraq in Baghdad has lost around half-a-million books and journals, including 5000 rare volumes. The University of Baghdad, which housed around 600,000 books, has been burnt down. The al-Awqaf Library, where 5000 Islamic manuscripts were housed, has also been looted and burnt.

 

These are just a few of the libraries which have suffered following the overthrow of Saddam Hussein's regime. Outside Baghdad, the story is depressingly familiar. In Mosul, about 900,000 books and journals in the university library were looted and burnt. The University of Basra has likewise been vandalised and pillaged. Countless thousands of documents representing the written record of public life and history of Iraq have disappeared or been destroyed. Because they are unique, many manuscripts may be lost forever. Books, however, may be replaced.

 

Inspired by Professor Yasir Suleiman, Director of the Edinburgh Institute for the Advanced Study of Islam and the Middle East, the University of Edinburgh and the Sunday Herald have joined forces in a unique bid to rebuild Iraq's libraries. 'The need for academic books in English for the university libraries in Iraq is very acute,' said Suleiman.

 

English is the medium of instruction in medicine, engineering, and the sciences. Post and undergraduates in the social sciences and the humanities use books in English for their research. Every Iraqi university has a department of English language and literature where the teaching is done in English. 'During the past 10 years, Iraqi academics took to selling their own personal libraries to supplement their incomes. For a scholar, the loss of a library represents a personal blow that strikes at the core of one's identity.'

 

In the past, Baghdad was a vibrant publishing centre. But during the past 15 years it has suffered badly. Crippled by rising public debts because of the Iraq-Iran war, and the effects of the UN sanctions, Iraqi universities have been unable to purchase books, especially books in the English language. 'I have received several appeals from Iraqi students in the past for books in English, and somehow managed to offer limited help when I could,' said Suleiman. 'When the Mongols, under Genghis Khan, sacked Baghdad in 1258, they destroyed its libraries. The event was recorded by the Arab historians as one of the darkest chapters in the history of the city in medieval times. Images of the looting of books and other historical treasures after the fall of Baghdad on April 13 will undoubtedly enter the annals of history as the modern equivalent of that distant, but not forgotten, trauma. 'Anything we can do to show solidarity with the Iraqi people, the Iraqi universities and a country mourning massive losses in its intellectual capital will help alleviate the trauma of a nation that has so much to contribute to our civilisation, as it has done so magnificently in the past.'

 

Already several publishers have generously agreed to donate their backlists in aid of Books for Baghdad, including Edinburgh University Press, which has pledged a copy of every book from its 1400-strong catalogue, and the Edinburgh-based publisher Canongate. The University of Edinburgh has been a seat of Arabic and Islamic learning in Scotland since 1751. Its department of Middle Eastern Studies is the only five-star rated department in the subject in the UK. Suleiman was elected to the Chair of Arabic and Islamic Studies in 1990.

 

Professor Timothy O'Shea, Principal of the University of Edinburgh, said: 'The University is delighted to be able to do something positive and practical to help fellow academics in Iraq. Our Centre for Islamic Studies has long been one of the leading lights in the academic world in this area, and we are proud of this initiative to help the University of Baghdad in its hour of need.' Andrew Jaspan, editor of the Sunday Herald, added: 'We will continue to support the humanitarian efforts in Iraq, but Professor Suleiman's plan to ask Scots to help replenish Iraq's libraries and centres of learning seemed such a compelling idea that we thought readers could give their support after the war.'

 

Antonia Swinson, Society of Authors in Scotland Chairman, said: 'We wholeheartedly support the Books for Baghdad campaign. Giving some of our own books and asking our publishers to donate more, is the very least we can do. I am sure every sector of Scottish life will be looking to see how to help their opposite numbers in Iraq.'

 

Catherine Lockerbie, Director of the Edinburgh International Book Festival, added: 'Books are a necessity for Iraq, not a luxury. 'Of course, a battered country in a state of transition needs water, food, the rule of law, but it also needs to kick-start its education system, to feed its hunger for intellectual sustenance. The EIBF is therefore committed to supporting this important campaign.' If you would like to donate to Books for Baghdad please contact Ian Revie of Edinburgh University at ian.revie@ed.ac.uk or Alan Taylor of the Sunday Herald at aftaylor2000@aol.com

 

 Copyright © 2003 smg sunday newspapers ltd. no.176088

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 A major project initiated by Prof. Yasir Suleiman of Edinburgh University. For details please refer to our Website. 

If you would like to donate to Books please contact

Ian Revie of Edinburgh University at ian.revie@ed.ac.uk

or

Alan Taylor of the Sunday Herald at aftaylor2000@aol.com

Prof. Sulaiman Interview (1)

Sunday Herald - 18 May 2003

 Help us fill the shelves of Iraq's burnt-out libraries

 The Sunday Herald is appealing to readers to donate vital

 English-language books

 By Alan Taylor

 

TODAY the Sunday Herald, in partnership with the University of Edinburgh, is launching a unique campaign to restock Iraq's looted libraries.  Amidst the shock over the plundering of priceless artworks from Iraq's National Museum of Antiquities, relatively little attention has been paid to the destruction of the nation's principal libraries. Now, however, to the despair of scholars around the world, the full extent of the damage is becoming clear. Many major research libraries in Iraq have been looted and burnt with the loss of hundreds of thousands of books and manuscripts, many of which may be irreplaceable. The National Library of Iraq in Baghdad has lost around half-a-million books and journals, including 5000 rare volumes. The University of Baghdad, which housed around 600,000 books, has been burnt down. The al-Awqaf Library, where 5000 Islamic manuscripts were housed, has also been looted and burnt.

 

These are just a few of the libraries which have suffered following the overthrow of Saddam Hussein's regime. Outside Baghdad, the story is depressingly familiar. In Mosul, about 900,000 books and journals in the university library were looted and burnt. The University of Basra has likewise been vandalised and pillaged. Countless thousands of documents representing the written record of public life and history of Iraq have disappeared or been destroyed. Because they are unique, many manuscripts may be lost forever. Books, however, may be replaced.

 

Inspired by Professor Yasir Suleiman, Director of the Edinburgh Institute for the Advanced Study of Islam and the Middle East, the University of Edinburgh and the Sunday Herald have joined forces in a unique bid to rebuild Iraq's libraries. 'The need for academic books in English for the university libraries in Iraq is very acute,' said Suleiman.

 

English is the medium of instruction in medicine, engineering, and the sciences. Post and undergraduates in the social sciences and the humanities use books in English for their research. Every Iraqi university has a department of English language and literature where the teaching is done in English. 'During the past 10 years, Iraqi academics took to selling their own personal libraries to supplement their incomes. For a scholar, the loss of a library represents a personal blow that strikes at the core of one's identity.'

 

In the past, Baghdad was a vibrant publishing centre. But during the past 15 years it has suffered badly. Crippled by rising public debts because of the Iraq-Iran war, and the effects of the UN sanctions, Iraqi universities have been unable to purchase books, especially books in the English language. 'I have received several appeals from Iraqi students in the past for books in English, and somehow managed to offer limited help when I could,' said Suleiman. 'When the Mongols, under Genghis Khan, sacked Baghdad in 1258, they destroyed its libraries. The event was recorded by the Arab historians as one of the darkest chapters in the history of the city in medieval times. Images of the looting of books and other historical treasures after the fall of Baghdad on April 13 will undoubtedly enter the annals of history as the modern equivalent of that distant, but not forgotten, trauma. 'Anything we can do to show solidarity with the Iraqi people, the Iraqi universities and a country mourning massive losses in its intellectual capital will help alleviate the trauma of a nation that has so much to contribute to our civilisation, as it has done so magnificently in the past.'

 

Already several publishers have generously agreed to donate their backlists in aid of Books for Baghdad, including Edinburgh University Press, which has pledged a copy of every book from its 1400-strong catalogue, and the Edinburgh-based publisher Canongate. The University of Edinburgh has been a seat of Arabic and Islamic learning in Scotland since 1751. Its department of Middle Eastern Studies is the only five-star rated department in the subject in the UK. Suleiman was elected to the Chair of Arabic and Islamic Studies in 1990.

 

Professor Timothy O'Shea, Principal of the University of Edinburgh, said: 'The University is delighted to be able to do something positive and practical to help fellow academics in Iraq. Our Centre for Islamic Studies has long been one of the leading lights in the academic world in this area, and we are proud of this initiative to help the University of Baghdad in its hour of need.' Andrew Jaspan, editor of the Sunday Herald, added: 'We will continue to support the humanitarian efforts in Iraq, but Professor Suleiman's plan to ask Scots to help replenish Iraq's libraries and centres of learning seemed such a compelling idea that we thought readers could give their support after the war.'

 

Antonia Swinson, Society of Authors in Scotland Chairman, said: 'We wholeheartedly support the Books for Baghdad campaign. Giving some of our own books and asking our publishers to donate more, is the very least we can do. I am sure every sector of Scottish life will be looking to see how to help their opposite numbers in Iraq.'

 

Catherine Lockerbie, Director of the Edinburgh International Book Festival, added: 'Books are a necessity for Iraq, not a luxury. 'Of course, a battered country in a state of transition needs water, food, the rule of law, but it also needs to kick-start its education system, to feed its hunger for intellectual sustenance. The EIBF is therefore committed to supporting this important campaign.' If you would like to donate to Books for Baghdad please contact Ian Revie of Edinburgh University at ian.revie@ed.ac.uk or Alan Taylor of the Sunday Herald at aftaylor2000@aol.com

 

 Copyright © 2003 smg sunday newspapers ltd. no.176088

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Prof. Sulaiman Interview (2)

Yasir Suleiman

 Sunday Herald - 01 June 2003

 Support 'overwhelming' in our appeal to fill Iraq's libraries

 By Liam McDougall, Arts Correspondent

  

 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  

 UP to 10,000 books have been pledged to help restock Iraq's looted libraries, just two weeks after the Sunday Herald launched its unique Books for Baghdad campaign, in partnership with the University of Edinburgh.

Since the start of the campaign, designed to assist the country's recovery from the devastation that has affected its principal libraries and universities following the overthrow of Saddam Hussein's regime, offers of help have flooded in from across the UK.

 

 In particular, the need for English-language texts on medicine, engineering and the sciences is extremely acute. For these subjects, English is the medium of instruction, while post and under-graduates in the social sciences and the humanities use English books for their research.

 

 In response to the crisis, Elsevier Science, one of the biggest medical science publishers in the UK, has pledged 'a substantial number' of books from its catalogue. The contribution will go towards restocking the depleted shelves in the country's university libraries.

 

 Blackwell's bookshop in Edinburgh has also said it will give £5000 worth of its stock -- specifically books in the fields of chemistry, physics, computing and business studies . As well as pledging a

 donation, the bookshop, at 53-59 South Bridge, Edinburgh, has agreed to act as a collection point for books that are being given to the campaign.

 

 Professor Yasir Suleiman, director of the Edinburgh Institute for the Advanced Study of Islam and the Middle East, who inspired the initiative, described the response so far as 'overwhelming'.

 

 'The Books for Baghdad appeal has really captured the imagination of the public. So far we have been given around 10,000 books and it has put us well on the way to achieving our target of collecting between 50,000 and 100,000 books.'

 

 Individuals had even traveled to the University of Edinburgh from Fife and Inverness specifically to deliver boxes of books to help the campaign.

 

 'A large number of people have also given offers of financial support but want to stay anonymous,' he added. 'In two weeks we have been given several thousands of pounds in this way as a direct response to the Sunday Herald and Edinburgh University's campaign.'

 

 Among the organisations that have given their support to the campaign is the British Society for Middle Eastern Studies, one of the world's largest area-studies associations. The society will publicise the campaign at its annual conference in Exeter in July.

 

 Already, several publishers have generously agreed to donate their backlists in aid of Books For Baghdad, including Edinburgh University Press, which has pledged a copy of every book from its 1400-strong catalogue and the Edinburgh-based publisher Canongate.

 

 Others who have pledged help for the campaign but have wanted to remain anonymous, have given their support after the full extent of the damage in Iraq became clear.

 

 Many of the nation's major research libraries have been looted and burnt with the loss of hundreds of thousands of books and manuscripts. In the chaos that followed war in the Gulf, the National Library of Iraq in Baghdad lost half-a-million books and journals, including 5000 rare volumes. The University of Baghdad, which housed around 600,000 books, has been burnt down.

 

Outside Baghdad, in Mosul, about 900,000 books and journals in the university library were looted and burnt. The University of Basra has likewise been pillaged.

 

'It is important that through this Scottish-led, British campaign we show our Iraqi colleagues that they have not been forgotten,' said Suleiman. 'We are confident that, in the coming weeks, offers of international support will be made. We look forward to offers of future help and support.'

 

If you would like to donate to Books For Baghdad please contact Ian Revie of Edinburgh University at ian.revie@ed.ac.uk or Alan Taylor of the Sunday Herald at aftaylor2000@aol.com.

 

 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 Copyright © 2003 smg Sunday newspapers ltd. no.176088

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Iraqi Hospitals Appeal - By NABA in collaboration with Human Relief Foundation (HRF)

Re:  Medical Relief – A call to every decent man and women.

NABA, in conjunction with The Human Relief Foundation, are collecting unused medical equipments/supplies from UK hospital to send to poor countries. An Iraqi Chapter is currently sending valuable medical supplies to Iraq. We have the support of many doctors/health workers. So far, we have managed to send around 900 mattresses, an Ambulance, 3 Anaesthetic machines, crutches, Zimmer frames, hospital trolleys, bed linen, artificial limbs, support belts, socks, hearing aids and many other materials and equipments.  These have a total value of £1.5 - 2 million pounds.  All these supplies and equipments proved to be most valuable for the Iraqi hospitals and they are in great demand.

We ask you to help us to collect more materials and equipments from your hospital if you can, as most of the above materials and equipments, if not collected, usually go to the tips. If you want my help to explain to you more please get in touch.

We also wish to establish other chapters to address needs in other countries such Palestine, Sudan, etc. Volunteers are needed to coordinate this work with NABA and HRF.

Looking forward to your support.
Dr R Hamdani, on behalf of NABA

Please send an email to naba@naba.org.uk and relief@arabhealth.co.uk

Or contact Dr Hamdani on telephone :0161 4380446 or 0161 8820535.

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Leukaemia Appeal

By Mohamed Khalifa

I am writing this email, with a lot of hope that the majority of people that receive it will read and act on it, and not just hit the delete button. Leukemia is a bone marrow disorder which has claimed the lives of many people. Studying in a hospital, I saw first hand the pain and suffering some children go through before they die. The sad thing is, it is a matter that most of us can do something about. 

I was shocked to find out that out of 360,000 volunteers registered with one of the biggest bone marrow transplant trusts in the UK, there were only few hundreds or so Arabs. I personally came across this issue by chance and was unaware of it. Thats why I'm certain that once this email gets around, we will see a big difference. For those who don't know, the chance of a match being successful, is greatly increased if you are from the same ethnic origin.

So if there is a young Arab kid dying of leukemia in the UK, the chances of him/her receiving a successful transplant is limited to the number of Arabs registered. 

Most of us can perhaps make a difference to someone's life by registering with a bone marrow trust. In the UK, there are 3 trusts; 'The Anthony Nolan Trust', 'The British Bone Marrow Register' and 'The Welsh Bone Marrow Donor Registry'. You only need to join one as patient searches are automatically referred to each of the three.

WHAT TO DO:

1- Go to either of the trusts websites to find out more and perhaps see where and when you can register. The websites are as follows:

a- The Anthony Nolan Trust   
    http://www.anthonynolan.org.uk

b- The British Bone Marrow Register 
    http://www.blood.co.uk

c- The Welsh Bone Marrow Donor Registry 
    http://www.welsh-blood.org.uk/wbmdr.html

2- Distribute this message to Arabs you know living in the UK, preferably to big mailing groups such university Arabic societies, mosque/church mailing groups, Islamic societies, and others.

This important and can save many lives ... If you have any questions/ inquiries, please email me at mo_khalifa@hotmail.com.